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Müllerian agenesis Radiology

Uterine agenesis is the extreme of Mullerian duct anomalies (Class I) where there is a complete absence of uterine tissue above the vagina. Epidemiology The uterine agenesis-hypoplasia spectrum accounts for ~10-15% of all Müllerian duct anomal.. In class U5 the Müllerian ducts are not, or not fully developed during formation. Most common is complete agenesis, also known as Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome. The typical form of MRKH syndrome (type I) is characterized by congenital absence of uterus, cervix and upper vagina Agenesis and hypoplasia. A result of failure of early formation of both Müllerian ducts, agenesis and hypoplasia will present with primary amenorrhea or cyclic pelvic pain related to hematocolpos or hematometra. This has also been termed Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome. Hysterosalpingography The müllerian ducts are paired embryologic structures that undergo fusion and resorption in utero to give rise to the uterus, fallopian tubes, cervix, and upper two-thirds of the vagina. Interruption of normal development of the müllerian ducts can result in formation of müllerian duct anomalies (MDAs) Failure in formation of one or both müllerian ducts results in uterine agenesis, hypoplasia, or unicornuate uterus. As the embryo grows, the mesonephric and paramesonephric ducts grow parallel to each other and toward the urogenital sinus. The lower parts of müllerian ducts are derived from or induced by the mesonephric ducts

Uterine agenesis Radiology Reference Article

  1. mullerian agenesis: an update. Obstet Gynecol 1997; 90:307-312. Crossref, Medline, Google Scholar; 96 Rosenberg HK, Sherman NH, Tarry WF, Duckett JW, Snyder HM. Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome: US aid to diagnosis. Radiology 1986; 161:815-819. Link, Google Schola
  2. Agenesis/Hypoplasia. The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome consists of congenital absence of the vagina and uterus and represents complete cessation of müllerian duct development; this syndrome is believed to be due to a deficiency of estrogen and other receptors. Ovarian neoplasms develop in young girls in association with this.
  3. Embryogeneisis OverviewMullerian Duct Anomalies (MDAs) 1-5% of the general population and 13-25% of patients with infertility or recurrent pregnancy loss (1) Affecting fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, and proximal 2/3 of the vagina. Normal ovaries and distal third of vagina
  4. 5 Professor of Radiology, Consultant Radiologist at Tawam and Al-Ain Hospitals; Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O.Box 17666, Al-Ain, UAE. PMID: 3099274
  5. Müllerian agenesis, also known as Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome or vaginal agenesis, is a congenital malformation characterized by a failure of the Müllerian duct to develop, resulting in a missing uterus and variable degrees of vaginal hypoplasia of its upper portion. Müllerian agenesis is the cause in 15% of cases of primary amenorrhoea. Because most of the vagina does not develop from the Müllerian duct, instead developing from the urogenital sinus, along with the.

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Mullerian Agenesis Diagnosis. Among individuals whose karyotypic and hormonal examinations for amenorrhea are found to be normal, tests to confirm the diagnosis of MRKH syndrome are conducted through Laparoscopy or radiology. Birth disorders of the uterus can be easily detected by: MRI; Ultrasound; Sonohysterography; X-ra Müllerian Agenesis (MA) is a rare congenital disorder of the female r eproductive system [3, 32] which has nu merous synonyms, these include the Mayer-Rokita nsky-Küster-Hause Müllerian Agenesis Müllerian agenesis (Mayer‐Rokitansky‐Küster‐Hauser syndrome) involves agenesis of the uterus and upper two thirds of the vagina; it has been observed in 1 in 5000 females. This diagnosis is typically considered when the patient presents during her mid to late teens with a complaint of primary amenorrhea Müllerian duct anomalies (MDAs) are the result of incomplete development, vertical or lateral fusion, or absorption of the müllerian ducts. The range of anomalies includes uterovaginal agenesis or hypoplasia, unicornuate uterus, uterus didelphys, bicornuate uterus, septate uterus, and arcuate uterus

Normal development of the Müllerian ducts depends on the completion of three phases: organogenesis, fusion and septal resorption. Organogenesis is characterised by the formation of both Müllerian ducts. Failure of this results in uterine agenesis/hypoplasia or a unicornuate uterus. Fusion is characterised by fusion of the ducts to form the uterus Müllerian agenesis is caused by embryologic underdevelopment of the müllerian duct, with resultant agenesis or atresia of the vagina, uterus, or both. Patients with müllerian agenesis usually are identified when they are evaluated for primary amenorrhea with otherwise typical growth and pubertal development Page Contents1 WHAT IS IT? 2 WHY IS IT A PROBLEM?3 WHAT MAKES US SUSPECT IT?4 ARCHIVE OF STANDARDIZED EXAM QUESTIONS WHAT IS IT? Müllerian agenesis refers tot he failure of the Müllerian duct to form. WHY IS IT A PROBLEM? The müllerian duct develops into the female internal structures which include: upper portion of vagina/lower proton. Müllerian agenesis, also referred to as Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, is a rare congenital abnormality that occurs in females and primarily affects the reproductive system. It is characterized by agenesis or underdevelopment of the uterus and vagina with normal development of the ovaries and secondary sexual characteristics . Abnormalities of the reproductive system increase their predisposition to unusual causes of abdominal pain such as hematocolpos/hematometra

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EMBRYOLOGY Two paired müllerian ducts ultimately develop into: fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, and the upper two thirds of the vagina. 3 phases of development as follows: 1. Organogenesis: One or both müllerian ducts may not develop fully, resulting in: uterine agenesis or hypoplasia (bilateral) or unicornuate uterus (unilateral) Thepaired Müllerian ducts are mesodermal in origin [1] and develop fromthe urogenital ridge Without anti-Müllerian hormone, the Müllerian ducts elongate: The cranial part develops into the Fallopian tubes The caudal part fuses into the uterovaginal primordium, which later forms the uterus, cervix and upperpart of the vagina [1, 2] The primitiveurogenital sinusoriginates from the endoderm andgives rise to thesinovaginal bulbs, which develop into the lower part of the vagina, viathe. Class I consists of segmental agenesis and a variable degree of uterovaginal hypoplasia (4). The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome consists of vaginal agenesis, which in 90% of patients is associated with cervical and uterine agenesis (while the remaining 10% present with a rudimentary müllerian structure)

Müllerian agenesis affects 1 in 4500 newborn girls and is considered as a sporadic anomaly. Women with MRKH Syndrome have a normal female chromosome pattern 46, XX with normal ovarian function. Mullarian agenesis 1. Müllerian Agenesis Diagnosis and Management (ACOG COMMITTEE OPINION) Prepared by Basem Hamed Lecturer of OB&Gyne - Zagazig university 2. Names: Müllerian agenesis Müllerian aplasia Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser • incidence:- 1 per 4,500-5,000 females BACKGROUND 3 Müllerian Agenesis (MA) has been estimated to affect 1 in 4,000 to 5,000 women. Considered to be sporadic, it is a rare congenital disorder of the female reproductive system depicted by the absence of the uterus, cervix and/or upper 1/5th portion o

The most extreme of the Müllerian anomalies is Müllerian agenesis, otherwise known as Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, which occurs due to agenesis or hypoplasia of the Müllerian ducts and affects approximately 1 in 5,000 females [].Müllerian agenesis involves congenital absence of the vagina and variable uterine development that ranges from agenesis to hypoplastic and. Müllerian agenesis and hypoplasia account for approximately 10% of müllerian malformations and are characterized by segmental vaginal agenesis and variable degrees of uterine hypoplasia [1]. Upper vaginal agenesis is the hallmark of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, which occurs in approximately 1 in 5000 women Radiology Section Mullerian Agenesis Associated with Turner's Syndrome PADMANABHAN ELAMPARIDHI1, RUDRAPPA RAMESH KUMAR2, SELVAKKALANJIYAM SIVARANJINIE3, RAJAKUMAR SIBHITHRAN

Müllerian duct agenesis: Agenesis of Müllerian ducts can be partial or complete . Complete duct agenesis is more common, causing the absence of uterus, cervix and upper vagina. This is known as Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome [5] It is associated with urinary tract and vertebral anomalies [5, 6 Müllerian duct anomalies (MDAs) are the result of incomplete development, vertical or lateral fusion, or absorption of the müllerian ducts. The range of anomalies includes uterovaginal agenesis or hypoplasia, unicornuate uterus, uterus didelphys, bicornuate uterus, septate uterus, and arcuate uterus. Correct diagnosis and classification of these anomalies are essential because pregnancy.

However, the combined uterovaginal agenesis is the most common type of agenesis (bilateral Müllerian agenesis) and it corresponds with MRKH or Rokitansky syndrome [40, 41]. This is an isolated Müllerian anomaly affecting both the Müllerian tubercle and ducts (Fig. 5a). Patients report primary amenorrhoea MRI is accepted as a highly accurate tool for the evaluation of müllerian duct anomalies [1-6] and thus is commonly used in clinical practice.In addition to characterizing uterine and vaginal anomalies, MRI offers the ability to image frequently associated renal anomalies Müllerian duct anomalies are infrequently encountered clinical problems and often present with difficulty in diagnosis. A high level of suspicion is the key to diagnosis, which is usually made. Class I: Müllerian Agenesis or Hypoplasia Class I consists of segmental agenesis and a variable degree of uterovaginal hypoplasia (4). The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome consists of vaginal agenesis, which in 90% of patients is associated with cervical and uterine agenesis (while the remaining 10% present with a rudimentary. The incidence of major urinary tract anomalies such as unilateral renal agenesis, unilateral or bilateral pelvic kidney, or horseshoe kidney is approximately 15% in patients with müllerian agenesis. 1, 2, 8 Anomalies of the skeletal system primarily affect vertebral body development and occur in approximately 5% to 10% of women with müllerian.

The prevalence of vaginal agenesis or class I uterine anomalies is 1:5000 female live births globally. The most prevalent form of vaginal agenesis is Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome and results in congenital aplasia or hypoplasia of mullerian derived structures. MRKH syndrome account for 5% to 10% of all mullerian anomalies It is characterized by the triad of didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic modality for demonstrating anatomic variation and associated complications. Keywords: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich, MRI, Müllerian Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, 3350-950 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E3, Canada ABSTRACT. The purpose of this study was to review the embryology, classification A database of clinical MR examination reports from 2002 to 2010 was used. Women with müllerian duct anomalies were identified with keyword searches including the following terms: MRI pelvis, hypoplasia, agenesis, Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser, unicornuate, didelphys, bicornuate, septate, arcuate, and diethylstilbestrol This class assembles extensively the bilateral Müllerian agenesis or hypoplasias, and therefore, includes the vaginal agenesis, the agenesis of the neck and of the lower uterus, of tubes and the combined form, characterized by the agenesis of the body of uterus, which may be with two separated rudimental uterine sketches communicating with two.

Reproductive performance of women with müllerian anomalies

Mullerian agenesis, a congenital malformation of the genital tract is the second most common cause of primary amenorrhea. Its etiology is poorly understood but it may be associated with renal, skeletal, and other abnormalities. The diagnosis is often made either radiologically or laparoscopically in patients in whom hormonal and karyotypic. Female Müllerian anomalies are the result of failure of formation, fusion or resorption of the Müllerian ducts and are relatively common, with a prevalence of 5.5-7.0% in the general population. While some of these anomalies are asymptomatic, those presenting with obstruction require accurate identification for optimal clinical management including potential surgical treatment. MRI is a.

THE PREVALENCE of Müllerian duct anomalies (MDA) in the general population has been previously estimated to be ∼1%. However, a more recent critical review of the existing data, taking into account the varying methods used for diagnosis, the changes in imaging methods over time, and the inconsistencies in the subjective classification of cases, demonstrates a prevalence of nearly 7% in the. Müllerian agenesis, also referred to as müllerian aplasia, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, or vaginal agenesis, has an incidence of 1 per 4,500-5,000 females. Müllerian agenesis is cau0073ed by embryologic underdevelopment of the müllerian duct, with resultant agenesis or atresia of the vagina, uterus, or both A case of müllerian agenesis, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) Syndrome, in a 16 year-old female with primary amenorrhea is reported. This patient exhibited normal female external physical characteristics with a shallow, blind vaginal pouch upon examination Introduction and hypothesis Ongoing debate exists about whether the rectovaginal septum (Denonvilliers' fascia) is myth or reality. This study evaluates magnetic resonance images (MRI) of women with Müllerian agenesis for the presence of fascial layers between the rectum and the bladder to test the hypothesis that this layer exists in the absence of the vagina

Imaging of Müllerian Duct Anomalies RadioGraphic

Müllerian agenesis is caused by embryologic underdevelopment of the müllerian duct, with resultant agenesis or atresia of the vagina, uterus, or both . PPT - Mullerian anomalies PowerPoint presentation free . Radiographics 2003 Sep-Oct; 23(5):e13. Troiano RN, McCarthy SM. Müllerian duct anomalies: imaging and clinical issues Müllerian duct anomalies (MDA) are manifestations of altered uterine and vaginal embryologic development. They are more prevalent among women with infertility, particularly those with adverse reproductive outcomes [].Endometriosis is a condition with endometrial tissue found outside the endometrium causing pelvic pain Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly of the urogenital tract involving Müllerian ducts and Wolffian structures, and it is characterized by the triad of didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis. It generally occurs at puberty and exhibits non-specific and variable symptoms with acute or pelvic pain shortly following menarche.

Clinical Presentation. Müllerian agenesis (i.e., Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome) was first described in 1829. Its incidence is reported to be 1 in every 5000 newborn females. 6 Because the vagina and associated uterine structures do not develop with this disorder, it is a ASRM Class IA müllerian anomaly. Patients typically present during their adolescent years with complaint of. Ectopic Pelvic Fibroid in a Woman With Uterine Agenesis and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome. Amaratunga T(1), Kirkpatrick I, Yan Y, Karlicki F. Author information: (1)*Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Manitoba; and †Ultrasound Department, Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, St. Cervical agenesis is a rare mullerian anomaly with less than 100 cases described in the literature. The etiology of cervical agenesis is not well understood. Presentation is typically lower abdominal pain that may be cyclic or sporadic around of the time of expected menarche, but no menstruation occurs due to the obstruction at the level of the. Background: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is an uncommon variant of Müllerian duct anomalies, consisting of uterine didelphys, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. It usually presents in a post-pubertal adolescent or adult woman in whom hematometrocolpos produces a pronounced mass effect and pain on the side of the obstructed hemivagina Mullerian Agenesis Diagnosis. The diagnosis for MA is made after radiological or endoscopic examination. General physical examination generally reveals a normal phenotypic woman with well-developed secondary sexual characteristics. Further, vaginal examination either shows a short or absence of vagina

Type II MRKH syndrome or MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia, renal aplasia and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association: there is incomplete aplasia associated with other malformations including renal (unilateral agenesis, ectopia of the kidneys or horseshoe kidney), skeletal (Klippel-Feil anomaly or fused vertebrae, mainly cervical. The 2 hemiuteri resulted from unsuccessful fusion of the malpositioned müllerian duct. Other described related anomalies include ureteral agenesis, bladder exstrophy, and congenital vesicovaginal fistula [10-12]. Renal agenesis is the most commonly reported associated renal anomaly

MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia-renal agenesis-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association is a unique and rare developmental disorder with four common features of uterine hypoplasia or aplasia, renal agenesis or ectopy, vertebral anomalies and short stature. We report a case of young female with primary amenorrhoea In Müllerian agenesis and androgen insensitivity the absence of the uterus is visible on ultrasound. Vaginal septum and imperforate hymen can be diagnosed with transvaginal, translabial and/or transabdominal ultrasound Developed by renowned radiologists in each specialty, STATdx provides comprehensive decision support you can rely on - Uterine Hypoplasia/Agenesis

The MD agenesis can be effectively managed by correct clinical and radiological diagnostic evaluation of the underlying condition and associated congenital anomalies. Psychosocial counseling of patient and her family members regarding the functional effects of genital anomaly along with its various treatment options is equally important to get. Agenesis of the bladder is rare, and only a few dozen cases have been recorded, almost all of them in girls. 458-463 Agenesis results from failure of separation of the ureters from the wolffian ducts. In this situation the ureters enter the Müllerian tract or posterior urethra. Alternatively the urorectal septum fails to form and the cloaca.

Müllerian Uterine Anomalies Radiology Ke

Imaging of Müllerian Duct Anomalies | RadioGraphics

Müllerian Duct Anomalies: Imaging and Clinical Issues

Agenesis/Hypoplasia - Radiology Imagin

Congenital Uterine Anomalies RAD-ASSIS

Müllerian Agenesis: Presenting as an Isolated Rudimentary

3. Department of Radiology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Abstract Müllerian ducts can form upper parts of normal female reproductive system and any failure in ductal fusion may result in to müllerian duct anomalies (MDA). We present a case of MDA and a uterus dysplasia with no evidence of cervical or upper vaginal tissue MRI allows for careful description of Müllerian duct anomalies, often leading to classification into the most widely accepted classification system for Müllerian duct anomalies. This system, developed by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, includes seven subtypes: uterine agenesis/hypoplasia, unicornuate, didelphys, bicornuate.

Second, imaging and exams in pediatric patients can be challenging, thus close collaboration with a radiologist is vital. 4. Vaginal agenesis is generally associated with agenesis of the uterus with a diagnosis of either Müllerian agenesis or androgen insensitivity, which are non-obstructive Müllerian anomalies Class I: Müllerian agenesis or hypoplasia (Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome) Varying degrees of vaginal and uterine agenesis with a prevalence of 1 in 5000 newborn females. Class II: Unicornuate uterus. Agenesis or hypoplasia of one of the two Müllerian ducts may have a communicating or non-communicating rudimentary horn Developed by renowned radiologists in each specialty, STATdx provides comprehensive decision support you can rely on - Müllerian Duct Anomalie Early developmental failure of the Müllerian ducts, for unknown reasons at around 5 weeks' gestation, results in various degrees of agenesis or hypoplasia of the uterus, cervix and upper two-thirds of the vagina. In agenesis (Figure 2), a uterus is not identified or small amounts of rudimentary tissue without differentiation may be present.

Raga F, Bonilla-Musoles F, Blanes J, Osborne NG. Congenital Müllerian anomalies: diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional ultrasound. Fertil Steril 1996; 65:523. Markham SM, Parmley TH, Murphy AA, et al. Cervical agenesis combined with vaginal agenesis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. Fertil Steril 1987; 48:143 Müllerian agenesis: etiology, diagnosis, and management. Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2000;55(10):644-649. 19. Maimoun L, Philibert P, Bouchard P, et al. Primary amenorrhea in four adolescents revealed. Müllerian malformations are the consequence of failure in the fusion or resorption processes of the two Müllerian ducts at around 9 weeks of gestation [].The mean prevalence in the general population is as high as 7 % [].Vaginal agenesis is a rare female congenital tract anomaly 1. Radiological imaging of uterine lesions. Dr/ ABD ALLAH NAZEER. MD. 2. Congenital Uterine Anomalies. The true incidence of congenital uterine anomalies in the general population and among women with RPL is not known accurately. Although incidences of 0.16 to 10% have been reported, the overall data suggest an incidence of 1% in the general.

(PDF) Müllerian duct anomalies: From diagnosis to intervention

Müllerian agenesis - Wikipedi

hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis, known as OHVIRA syndrome or Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome, is a rare congenital anomaly represented by a Müllerian duct associated with mesonephric duct anomalies 1,2 . From the Department of Pediatric Surgery, Radiology an UNLABELLED Mullerian agenesis, a congenital malformation of the genital tract is the second most common cause of primary amenorrhea. Its etiology is poorly understood but it may be associated with renal Müllerian agenesis (i.e., Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome) was first described in 1829. Its incidence is reported to be 1 in every 5000 newborn females [].Because the vagina and associated uterine structures do not develop with this disorder, it is an ASRM Class IA Müllerian anomaly

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Renal agenesis was found in 17 (29.8%) of 57 patients. No other renal anomalies were identified. Renal agenesis was more frequent in patients with uterus didelphys (13/16 cases). Renal agenesis was also seen in patients with uterine agenesis (2/5 cases) and unicornuate uterus (2/7 cases) Ramaswamy S: Müllerian agenesis with vaginal prolapse. Case report Br J Obstet Gynaecol 93:640, 1986 : 16. Peters WA, Uhlir JK: Prolapse of a neovagina created through self-dilatation. Obstet Gynecol 76:904, 1990 : 17. Schaffer J, Fabricant C, Carr BR: Vaginal vault prolapse after nonsurgical and surgical treatment of müllerian agenesis We report a case of a 17-year-old female with Müllerian agenesis who presented with right sided abdominal pain clinically suspicious for acute appendicitis. Multimodality imaging workup revealed a heterogeneous cystic right upper quadrant mass with surrounding fluid and inflammatory changes. Surgical resection of this mass was performed and a histopathologic diagnosis of a hemorrhagic. Müllerian Agenesis Diagnosis, Management, and Treatment. Obstetrics & Gynecology: May 2013 - Volume 121 - Issue 5 - p 1134-1137. doi: 10.1097/01.AOG.0000429659.93470.ed. Free; Metrics This document has been withdrawn or is no longer available. Please. To describe the association of müllerian agenesis with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

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(Pdf) Müllerian Agenesis Embryologic and Clinical

German colleagues reported urologic malformations in 82 (29 %) out of 284 women with Müllerian duct agenesis [14]. Unilateral renal agenesis was the most common malformation (18.8 %) and a solitary kidney was associated with a duplex collecting system in 25.6 % of the patients [14] Rokitansky syndrome Radiology Rokitansky bei Amazon . Die besten Bücher bei Amazon.de. Kostenlose Lieferung möglic ; Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH), also known as Müllerian agenesis, is a congenital anomaly characterized by vaginal agenesis associated with, in the majority of cases, a spectrum of other genitourinary tract abnormalities In 1998, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine classified the uterine anatomic types as müllerian anomalies or vaginal anomalies. According to this classification system, vaginal atresia is an anomaly classified as type I, which refers to agenesis and hypoplasia of the uterus. [] As a consequence, vaginal atresia is occasionally termed müllerian agenesis

THE ROLE OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN THE EVALUATIONUterine Anomaly Classification – Sonographic Tendencies

Troiano RN, McCarthy SM. Müllerian duct anomalies: imaging and clinical issues. Radiology. 2004;233:19-34. Santos XM, Krishnamurthy R, Bercaw-Pratt JL, Dietrich JE. The utility of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging versus surgery for the characterization of müllerian anomalies in the pediatric and adolescent population Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is a disorder that occurs in females and mainly affects the reproductive system. This condition causes the vagina and uterus to be underdeveloped or absent, although external genitalia are normal. Affected women usually do not have menstrual periods due to the absent uterus MRI finds rudimentary müllerian structures in 90% of patients with müllerian agenesis. These structures are difficult to interpret on ultrasonography. Evaluation for associated congenital anomalies is necessary since up to 53% of patients with müllerian agenesis have concomitant congenital malformations, particularly of the urinary tract and. Radiology Case. 2012 Apr; 6(4):17-24 :: DOI: 10.3941/jrcr.v6i4.992 ABSTRACT Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is a spectrum of Müllerian duct anomalies characterized by congenital aplasia of the uterus and of the upper part (2/3) of the vagina, in young women presenting otherwise with normal endocrine status